Kelly Alto

Rob Huebel and Paul Scheer chat using ‘Drive Share’ to take North Korea comedy world by storm [EXCLUSIVE VIDEO] [GoldDerby]

Kelly Alto
Rob Huebel and Paul Scheer chat using ‘Drive Share’ to take North Korea comedy world by storm [EXCLUSIVE VIDEO] [GoldDerby]

“We are trying to be the only vehicular comedians out there,” declares Paul Scheer with Rob Huebel about their short-form series “Drive Share” (watch the exclusive video above). The show tackles the funny side of ride sharing apps and comes off the heels of their bus-based comedy special “Crash Test.” He says that “we are on an aircraft carrier right now and that’s just for interviews. We’re off the shore of North Korea.” Huebel explains, “This is a very expensive boat that we rented. The U.S.S. Donald Trump. We went the wrong way for weeks, so we had to loop back around. We have ‘the most’ secret submarines. We’ll tell you when we’re going to launch.”

Huebel then explains where the idea for “Drive Share” came from: “The more we talked to people everybody had some f***ed up ride share story where the driver was really weird, or they shared a ride with someone who was also terrible. It got us thinking. ‘What if we got funny comedians and put them in a car and wrote funny bits for them?’”

On taking the North Korea comedy world by storm, Scheer jokes, “I like the idea that the show could almost go anywhere around the world. Because every country has their own system of ride sharing. I’d love to see how other people’s cultures would affect us. So I’m moving to North Korea; that’s why we’re so close right now. We are having a few difficulties getting the web series going in North Korea. We have a lot of paperwork to get through. Most of it just mentions how good the leadership is and how great everybody is and that there are no problems.”

The 30-episode web series needed many different passengers and drivers, creating a big casting exercise. Huebel notes that “we do a lot of improv with the ‘Upright Citizen’s Brigade,’ so we know the next wave of comedy people coming up. We got some more established people with these up-and-comers to improvise and raise the bar.” Scheer adds that “when we had 100 roles to cast, it forced us to meet and see new people. We tried hard to surprise ourselves. We were discovering them.”

Scheer also explains that “the cool thing about this show is that we are in the competitive short-format, live action category for the Emmys. And that’s where everybody wants to go. Others try to manipulate their stuff to get there, but we felt we could actually make shows that were less than 10 minutes.” Huebel agrees that the shorter web format worked well for the series: “We figured more people are watching stuff on their phones now. Whether they are watching it on a a plane, or the subway, or driving a top secret submarine.”

Be sure to make your Emmy predictionsWeigh in now with your picks so that Hollywood insiders can see how their TV shows and performers are faring in our Emmy odds. You can keep changing your predictions until just before nominees are announced on July 13. And join in the fierce debate over the 2017 Emmys taking place right now with Hollywood insiders in our TV forums. Read more Gold Derby entertainment news.